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Letting Go

“What room can I de-clutter now?” My daughter grinned at me. I didn’t grin back. “Slow down,” I said, “we have six months before we move.” She laughed and said it might take longer to do the down-sizing we will have to do to move from a five bedroom into a two-bedroom house. It isn’t going to be easy for me. I confess I am a packrat and I tend to hold on to things a little too tightly. Things like books. My other daughter said we should advertise this way – “House For Sale, Includes Library.” I didn’t grin at that comment, either.

The problem is that so many of the things around me have a story attached. Many of the things are connected to people – friends and family. Letting them go means letting go of emotional attachments and memories, so it’s hard, even though I tell myself that . . .

“What room can I de-clutter now?” My daughter grinned at me. I didn’t grin back. “Slow down,” I said, “we have six months before we move.” She laughed and said it might take longer to do the down-sizing we will have to do to move from a five bedroom into a two-bedroom house. It isn’t going to be easy for me. I confess I am a packrat and I tend to hold on to things a little too tightly. Things like books. My other daughter said we should advertise this way – “House For Sale, Includes Library.” I didn’t grin at that comment, either.

The problem is that so many of the things around me have a story attached. Many of the things are connected to people – friends and family. Letting them go means letting go of emotional attachments and memories, so it’s hard, even though I tell myself that those friends are still there and the family memories will always remain in my mind. I like having tangible reminders, things I can see and hold. I am comfortable in the midst of my clutter. Perhaps I have security issues, but the thought of leaving it all is a little frightening.

I can’t imagine what it must have been like for the Son of God to leave his home in heaven. He was in a position of exaltation – a place of power and honour and glory. Yet He stepped away from it all to be born in a humble place in the middle of a dark world. He would know all the pain and sorrow of that world as he grew, and then that world, the very people for whom he had given up so much, would turn against him and crucify him.
Knowing all of that, He still came to us, still gave up all that he had known, for the love of a people who would reject Him.

Jesus had no security issues. He knew exactly who He was and who His Father was. He knew the plan, the glorious plan laid out for mankind and He was willing to do His part to accomplish it.

It is fitting, therefore, that we celebrate Christmas. It is fitting that children dress up in bathrobes and mimic ancient costumes to help us remember. It is fitting that choirs sing about wise men who traveled great distances to meet him, that ordinary common people bow their knee before his manger. There has been no greater sacrifice. There has been no greater love. There will never be a greater Saviour than the one who came as a tiny baby some two thousand years ago.

"Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men on whom his favor rests." (Luke 2:14).
 
Merry Christmas to you all!

Marcia Laycock is a pastor's wife and freelance writer living in Alberta Canada.  Her devotional book, The Spur of the Moment has been endorsed by Janette Oke, Phil Callaway and others.  To order, and to view more of Marcia's writing, see her web site - www.vinemarc.com
Copyright Marcia Lee Laycock, 2000, 2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006

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